The William E. James Stereograph Collection

Newspaper Articles

STEREOSCOPIC VIEWS OF THE NEW ENGLAND KITCHEN-These gems of Photography are now for sale at JAMES' Gallery, 267 Fulton street.

New England Kitchen, Brooklyn Long Island Sanitary Fair, 1864

New England Kitchen, Brooklyn Long Island Sanitary Fair, 1864

Photography by William E. James


Newspaper Articles

The Brooklyn Photographic Society. Another society for the promotion of art has been added to the institutions of Brooklyn. The photographic art is perhaps not so generally appreciated in America as in France, England and Germany, where it is made the study and entertainment of art-loving and scientific amateurs, yet there is a growing admiration for the art, and many amateur photgraphists are to be found among our own citizens. For those who have the means and leisure to indulge their tastes, photography is a pleasing study, and an entertaining and useful pursuit. The uses of the art have so multiplied, and new discoveries are continually being made, adding an increasing interest to the pursuit. The perfection to which photography has been brought in its chief application, that of portraiture, is exhibited in the galleries of such artist as Williamson. Its utilitarian purpose is shown in the reproduction of pictures in all styles and sizes, which are taking the place of engravings, on account of their superiority and cheapness.

It is computed that there are, at least, a hundred amateur photographists in Brooklyn, in addition to a larger number of resident professionals, and the idea of forming a photographic association is one that might have occurred some time since, as similar associations have been in flourishing existence for some years past in New York and other cities. The proposition to form a Brooklyn Photographic Association originated in a recent gathering of professionals for mere business purposes. On the 20th of June a meeting of proprietors of photographic establishments in this city was held at James’s gallery to consider questions of charges, with a view of fixing uniform rates. Successive meetings were held which led to interchanges of views, upon less mercenary topics, and it was resolved to form an Association. Meetings for that purpose were held at the different galleries, a plan of organization adopted, and a Constitution and code of by-laws prepared.

The first public meeting was held last evening at the Brooklyn Institute. There were some fifty gentlemen present. Mr. W. E. James occupied the chair. Mr. W. A. Miller Officiated as Secretary, Mr. Charles H. Williamson, Treasurer. Among those present we noticed many of the leading photographers of Brooklyn, Messrs. Sherman, Morand, Douglass, Harrison, Swanton, and others.

The constitution previously adopted was read again. It provides that the organization shall be known as “The Brooklyn Photographic Society;” its object, the elevation of the art of photography, the instruction and amusement of its members, who may be either members of the photographic profession, amateurs or sincere lovers of the art. The object of the Society more fully explained is to promote a knowledge of the natural laws which govern the action of light; discussion of views upon the processes of the art, the study of effects, the arrangement of figure, and all that appertains to the art. It is proposed to hold meetings twice a month.

A proposition was made and adopted that those who wished to join the Society, should then sign the constitution, and thus constitute a regular membership at once. Forty-one gentlemen then put there names upon the roll and paid the required initiation fee of two dollars.

Mr. Burgess, chairman of the committee previously appointed to make nominations for officers, reported that the committee had been unable to make up their minds upon a ticket, and thought it would be more satisfactory to select the candidates in open meeting. The committee then asked to be discharged. Agreed to.

Mr. Burgess then moved that the Society proceed to the election of officers.

A motion was made to lay this matter over until next meeting, when by a general notification of the profession and well known amateurs, a much larger attendance would be ensured. It was urged that but a few persons had been notified of this meeting; that a large number of person who would readily join the society were probably not yet aware of its existence. On the other hand, it was argued that the sooner the Society was organized the better; it would become a fixed fact, and gather strength and influence from that date. The motion to postpone was lost, and the Society proceeded to the

ELECTION OF OFFICERS, with the following result:
President-Nicholas Pike
Vice-President-W.E.James.
Recording Secretary-W.E.Swanton
Corresponding Secreatary-N.G.Burgess
Treasure-Ang. Morand

Mr. James proposed as the subject for discussion at the next meeting “prices,” which was adopted, and the meeting adjourned to the second Tuesday in August.

The Society is now fairly launched upon the tide of existence, and we wish it every success. We cannot, however, refrain from observing that the selection of the first topic for public discussion is not in accordance with the avowed object of the Society. It is strictly a business question, interesting on the profession, and should have been settled outside among themselves. The introduction of such business matters at the start is likely to have the effect of making the Society a mere trades’ union, instead of an association for the elevation of the art.

Carte de visite of an unidentified naval officer

Carte de visite of an unidentified naval officer

Photography by William E. James


Newspaper Articles

STEREOSCOPIC VIEWS OF THE FUNERAL PROCESSION.-We have received from Mr. W. E. James, photographer, of No. 267 Fulton street, a series of stereoscopic views of the President’s funeral procession as it passed up Broadway, New York. To take a photographic picture of a mass of people, many of whom must be in motion, and as in some of these pictures of soldiers on the march and vehicles in motion would seem to be an impossibility. But recent improvements in the art enable operators to take what are called “instantaneous views,” that is fix the impression in an instant and produce a faithful and vivid picture of moving scenes. Mr. James’ pictures are remarkably distinct and well finished, and will form an interesting addition to the standard stereoscopic collection. Mr. James is also preparing his Fort Sumter and Charleston views in stereoscopic form.

Lincoln's Funeral Procession, Broadway St., New York, 1865

Lincoln's Funneral Procession, Broadway St., New York, 1865

Photography by William E. James


Newspaper Articles

CHARLESTON BROUGHT TO BROOKLYN. CHARLESTON AND FORT SUMPTER AT THE ATHENEUM. A SERIES OF ILLUMINATED, INSTANTANEOUS PHOTOGRAPHIC VIEWS, ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE TRIP OF THE STEAMER OCEANUS To Charleston on the occasion of the RESTORING THE OLD FLAG ON FORT SUMPTER. ALSO THE FUNERAL OBSEQUIES OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN, AS SEEN ON BROADWAY DURING THE PROCESSION, Will be exhibited at the ATHENEUM MONDAY EVENING, May 15, and EVERY EVENING DURING THE WEEK (except Thursday) and on WENDSDAY and SatURDAY AFTERNOONS. Those who were disappointed in procuring tickets for the Excursion by the Oceanus, can have much of its enjoyment, with none of its discomforts, by attending this Exhibition. ADMITTANCE. Single Tickets 25 Family tickets (admitting 5 persons) $1.00 Commence-Evenings, at 8 o’clock; on afternoons at 3 ˝ o’clock. Those views were photographed by Mr. W. E. James, No. 267 fulton street, who accompanied the excursion for the purpose.

Beecher's Oration, Fort Sumter, Charleston, South Carolina, April 14th, 1865

Beecher's Oration, Fort Sumter, Charleston, South Carolina, April 14th, 1865

Photography by William E. James


Newspaper Articles

SHIPPING. EXCURSION TO PARIS, ITALY, GREECE, CRIMEA, HOLY LAND, EGYPT, &c. The magnificent sidewheel steamship "QUAKER CITY," will leave with the above excursion (accompanied by Lieut. Gen. Sherman,) on SATURDAY, JUNE 8TH, At 3 o'clock P.M. The ship will visit St. Michael's, Gibraltar, Marseilles, Genoa, Leghorn, Caprera, (Garibaldi's Home,) Oivita Veochia, Naples, Palermo, Athens. Corinth, Constantinople, Sebastopol, Smyrna, Holy Land, Egypt, Malta, Oigliara, Palma, Valentia, Madeira and Bermuda, and the party will have ample opportunity to visit Paris, Lyons and all the points of interest in Italy, Switzerland and the Holy Land. Gen Sherman writes:-"Your programme is all that could be desired, and should be adhered to absolutely." Applications to join the party, now nearly complete, the number being limited to 110, must be made to the Committee through C.C. DUNCAN, 117 Wall street, N.Y.

Quaker City Passengers, Mark Twain circled, 1867

Quaker City Passengers, 1867, Mark Twain circled

Photography by William E. James


Newspaper Articles

INSTRUCTIVE ENTERTAINMENTS FOR SCHOOLS. –The teachers of many of the Sunday Schools of this city and New York are entertaining and instructing the children by means of that beautiful instrument, the Stereopticon, by means of which a new value has been imparted to photography. Mr. W. E. James, the well-known photographer, of 267 Fulton St., who has a high reputation for the excellence of his stereoscopic views, which he has made a specialty, has latterly devoted himself to perfecting the Stereopticon, and getting up a series of excellent views of interesting and remarkable places, with which the children are made acquainted by means of these exhibitions, which are given for the schools only, coupled with instructive descriptions suited to the comprehension of the children. Much pleasure is afforded the children, who acquire, at the home time, a good deal of instruction. Last night the Stereopticon was exhibited to the Hanson Place M. E. Sabbath School.

Fountain of the Virgin, Nazareth, 1867

Fountain of the Virgin, Nazareth, 1867

Photography by William E. James


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